Article Published in Journal of Open Humanities Data

Title: Normalized Datasets of Harnack’s Reconstruction of Marcion’s Gospel

Abstract: These two datasets are the first born-digital, normalized, peer-reviewed datasets of Harnack’s classic reconstruction of Marcion’s Gospel. The first consists of human-readable postclassical Greek, the second of lemmatized and morphologically tagged text following the openly licensed BibleWorks Greek Morphology schema. The recent deluge of critical editions of Marcion’s Gospel makes Harnack’s public domain work even more relevant as scholars turn from theology- to text-based approaches to restore Marcion’s Gospel and account for its place in the editorial history of early canonical and non-canonical Gospels. These datasets resource Marcion’s Gospel becoming a major topic of interest in Computational Linguistics research.

DOI: http://doi.org/10.5334/johd.47

SBL Proposal Accepted for Digital Humanities section: Introducing LODLIBs

[Cross-posted from Vocesanticae.com]

Got confirmation of acceptance of a second paper this morning. Thank you to the session chairs (Garrick Allen and Paul Dilley) and the review committee for the opportunity to present this research.

Title: Introducing Linked Open Data Living Informational Books

Abstract: In a recent article, Claire Clivaz surveys the rise of VREs (Virtual Research Environments) that allow for scientific hypothesis-driven, iterative, and collaborative research in the Humanities. In this presentation, we propose a new kind of VRE, the Linked Open Data Living Informational Book or LODLIB, essentially a scientific hypothesis-driven iterative digital codex. LODLIBs follow the structure of scientific articles (introduction, materials and methods, results, discussion), leverage international Linked Open Data standards (unique and interconnected DOIs), rely on non-commercial Open Science repositories, include internal data dictionaries and lexicographical resources, embed datasets and code within the digital book, invite global open peer-review and collaboration, and allow for cycles of continuous improvement characteristic of agile software and systems development. Essentially, the LODLIB reimagines the codex as human- and machine-readable software, bringing together research and publishing, the Sciences and the Humanities. The LODLIB format inverts the power- and economic relationships between academic authors and publishers, opens academic discourse to the global public, allows for rich analytics about readership and citations, and has the potential to make monographs and compilations go viral in online environments. The conclusion will relate the story of the presenter’s prototyping of the LODLIB format to propose and realize a new, scientific solution to Q and the Synoptic Problem.

Subjects: Computer-Assisted Research | Historical Criticism | Lexicography

Scholarly Communication and Religious Studies Discourse and Debates

[Cross-posted from my other blog: vocesanticae.com]

I’ve been emailing back and forth a bit the last few days with my friend and academic colleague, Dieter Roth, the world’s leading expert on the study of Marcion and his texts. We met at a conference at KU Leuven a few years back, one graciously hosted by Joseph Verheyden and John Kloppenborg. It was such a wonderful gathering. I’ve let Dieter know that I value our scholarly friendship and eagerly welcome his feedback. He said he’s working on a response.

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