The California State University and academic publishing systems are broken and racist. The only way to save them is to de-corporatize and de-racialize them.

CSU undergraduate students pay on average about $15,000 a year in tuition and fees. Many of our students can’t even afford food or a place to live, not to mention textbooks.

CSU Presidents make on average well over $400,000/year when housing benefits are included. Some attorneys and executives at the Chancellor’s office make more than university presidents. The Chancellor makes $625,000/year, which is more than the combined salary of President Biden ($400,000) and Governor Newsom ($210,000). Administrators have largely grown out of touch with the daily lives, concerns, and needs of students and faculty. They are working for themselves and their corporate welfare classmates, not for us and not for the common good.

The corrupt culture of corporate greed and legalistic voodoo has completely undermined higher education as a call to public service.

BLM happened and is still happening. Virtue signals and woke posturing abound daily from administrators, but have any substantive changes been made to CSU budgets? No.

To borrow a phrase from Ayanna Presley, “policy is my love language.” To take it one step further, for students, “policy and budgets are our love language.”

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Publisher Monopoly Long-Game: Make Libraries Renters, Not Owners

Lifting up this excellent article in the Daily Beast by Jennie Rose Halperin, the Executive Director of Library Futures. It highlights the recent forum at Georgetown Law with Senator Ron Wyden and provides a quick litany of the negative impacts of ebook licensing on public education. To quote just one example:

The draconian terms mean, for example, that a single e-copy of The Diary of Anne Frank can cost a school district as much as $27 per student per year—with the lion’s share of the money going to billion-dollar publishing companies.

Library Futures is welcoming consortial and university partners to join in activism around technological and educational initiatives to preserve Library rights. Johns Hopkins has recently joined as a partner. Here’s hoping the Cal State Libraries will consider joining as well!