Turning Open Access Academic Books into BIPOC Art Galleries

One of the best parts about my job as a ScholComm Librarian is working with amazing students on meaningful publishing projects. As part of a team working on a Dept of Ed funded grant with our National Resource Center for Asian Languages, I had the wonderful privilege of collaborating with a team of BFA and MFA illustrators to make Vietnamese language books in support of bilingual K-12 education in Orange County. One of our illustrators, a young, gifted and Black artist by the name of Leah Simone Metters, brought tremendous energy, creativity and leadership to the project.

Now that my Open Science book experiment on the First Gospel (Qn) is almost a year old, over 1000 pages, more than 325,000 words, has over 2500 unique downloads, and is the basis for an upcoming peer-reviewed presentation in the Digital Humanities section of the Society of Biblical Literature this November, it felt like the right time to take the book to the next level of professional publishing. So I decided to commission book cover art, and I could think of no artist better suited to realize my vision for the book than Leah.

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How to Make an Open Access Article Fee Waiver Request

Copying the letter I sent today to Cambridge University Press both as a ScholComm diary entry and as an example to authors as to how you can self-advocate for OA fee waivers. Squeaky wheels and such…

April 17, 2021

Dear Cambridge University Press Representative,

Thank you for your excellent work supporting high-quality, peer-reviewed academic publishing. I am writing as the corresponding author of an article recently accepted for your journal, Harvard Theological Review, to ask for a waiver of the Gold Open Access APC of $3200.

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SBL Proposal Accepted for Digital Humanities section: Introducing LODLIBs

[Cross-posted from Vocesanticae.com]

Got confirmation of acceptance of a second paper this morning. Thank you to the session chairs (Garrick Allen and Paul Dilley) and the review committee for the opportunity to present this research.

Title: Introducing Linked Open Data Living Informational Books

Abstract: In a recent article, Claire Clivaz surveys the rise of VREs (Virtual Research Environments) that allow for scientific hypothesis-driven, iterative, and collaborative research in the Humanities. In this presentation, we propose a new kind of VRE, the Linked Open Data Living Informational Book or LODLIB, essentially a scientific hypothesis-driven iterative digital codex. LODLIBs follow the structure of scientific articles (introduction, materials and methods, results, discussion), leverage international Linked Open Data standards (unique and interconnected DOIs), rely on non-commercial Open Science repositories, include internal data dictionaries and lexicographical resources, embed datasets and code within the digital book, invite global open peer-review and collaboration, and allow for cycles of continuous improvement characteristic of agile software and systems development. Essentially, the LODLIB reimagines the codex as human- and machine-readable software, bringing together research and publishing, the Sciences and the Humanities. The LODLIB format inverts the power- and economic relationships between academic authors and publishers, opens academic discourse to the global public, allows for rich analytics about readership and citations, and has the potential to make monographs and compilations go viral in online environments. The conclusion will relate the story of the presenter’s prototyping of the LODLIB format to propose and realize a new, scientific solution to Q and the Synoptic Problem.

Subjects: Computer-Assisted Research | Historical Criticism | Lexicography

Google Scholar Takes a Bite out of ResearchGate.net and Academia.edu

On March 23, the Google Scholar team announced on their blog a new contribution to the OA self-archiving scholarly ecosystem. Google has released new functionality to help authors identify which articles are deposited OA in compliance with funder (whether gov or NGO) OA mandates all the while leveraging Google Drive–connected to a Google Scholar author’s profile–into an article self-archiving solution.

A SWOT-styled analysis follows under the fold:

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Linked Open Data Protest against ResearchGate.net and Academia.edu

After having spent countless hours curating publication lists and metadata on these platforms and fielding numerous requests from their bots and users to upload content, as a self-motivated academic author I’ve finally decided to reset the nature of my relationship with ResearchGate.net and Academia.edu.

Besides deleting dozens of my publications from these sites, here is the core of my personal Linked Open Data protest:

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