How Libraries Can Learn Not to Hate Commencement

This op-ed was published earlier today in the CSU Fullerton student newspaper, the Daily Titan.


Back in the pre-digital age, when university libraries bought physical resources, graduating students knew that the university library collections would continue to be there for them. Even if it meant a trip back to campus, that reservoir of curated knowledge would always be available to enjoy.

These days, graduating students are sadly, abruptly and completely cut off from most of the digital resources that we librarians work so hard to supply and teach students how to use.

How did this happen? How have libraries learned to hate commencement?

[Link to full article]

Scholarly Communication and Religious Studies Discourse and Debates

[Cross-posted from my other blog: vocesanticae.com]

I’ve been emailing back and forth a bit the last few days with my friend and academic colleague, Dieter Roth, the world’s leading expert on the study of Marcion and his texts. We met at a conference at KU Leuven a few years back, one graciously hosted by Joseph Verheyden and John Kloppenborg. It was such a wonderful gathering. I’ve let Dieter know that I value our scholarly friendship and eagerly welcome his feedback. He said he’s working on a response.

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Black Collections Matter: Call for a 10% Library Budget Pledge to Support African-American Academic Publishing

Systemic and institutional racism is an enormous problem in academic publishing, and this thoroughly infects libraries as well. Charlotte Roh’s 2018 CARL presentation and accompanying slides should be mandatory reading in this regard, and her citations lead out to lots of other important and relevant scholarly articles and reports. So if you haven’t read Roh’s work, please stop and do so now.

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Wayback Machine Compare: An Ideal Digital-Professional Portfolio Tool

Don’t know how I missed this, but Internet Archive back in October of 2019 released a new feature on its Wayback Machine to enable users easily to compare different versions of an archived web page. I’ve been hoping for such a feature for a while as a crucial tool for Digital History / Digital Humanities and even made inquires to private software companies about developing it. I’m elated that the adept and agile team at Wayback Machine built it directly into their UI.

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